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Our Caregivers

It takes a special type of person to be a professional caregiver. Their work is done in the privacy of their client’s home and often goes unnoticed. The caregiver provides skills and offers best practices to promote good health, independence and overall well being of their client.

During the period of employment, caregivers will assume many different roles – from providing transportation to and from the doctor or grocery store to preparing meals for the week or just being a friend to listen when no one else is there to hear.

There are many different reasons for employing a caregiver. Clients may have incontinence, Alzheimer’s, stroke, weakness or depression. Wounds and broken bones are also among the many ailments that a caregiver can encounter. To be a good caregiver a person needs to be caring and fully prepared to meet any of the ailments and conditions they may need to deal with.

Do's and Do Not's of a Professional Caregivers

A professional caregiver should not:

Say or do anything to a client or family member that you would not want said or done to you.
Spend the shift on the phone talking to their friends.
Use the client's phone without permission.
Use the client's computer, TV or other personal devices.
Bring their laundry or any other household chore that needs to be done.
Help themselves to food without asking or being offered.
Give medical advice.

A professional caregiver should:

Seek continuing education to be up to date on current issues affecting the elderly.
Be respectful, reliable and loving.
ALWAYS be on time for their shift.<

Our caregivers know that they can never replace the love and support of a client’s family, however we can offer helpful services to reduce stress on the family. Our caregivers pass evaluations to guarantee quality care. We follow up with each client at least once a month to ensure every person we serve receives the best quality care.